Wed04162014

Opinion

Republicans and the new ‘white flight’

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Now that the GOP-manufactured economic crisis is over (for the next several months, anyway), one might say the lesson for the Republican Party is best expressed by that old warning: Be careful what you wish for.

Driven by its reactionary Tea Party faction and the Right's newest demagogue, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), the GOP tried to use forcing a shutdown of the government and the debt-default threat to hijack the democratic process – to effectively repeal Obamacare and destroy the authority of the president.

However, wrapped in self-delusion, they misjudged President Obama and the Congressional Democrats – and, as the Republican Party's sinking to record lows in many polls show, the American public – just as they did in the 2012 national election. Not for nothing did conservative pundit Charles Krauthammer, watching the battle unfold, label them Congress' "suicide caucus."

The outrageous stunt has likely tilted the political calculus for both the 2014 midterm congressional elections and the 2016 presidential contest more in the Democrats' favor. One has to believe that the Democratic Party get-out-the-vote strategists, who've performed so superbly in 2008 and 2012, are already figuring the best ways to make hay from the GOP's missteps.

But one of several critical questions this astonishing episode of American history has cast into sharp relief is who's going to win the political war that's now broken into the open within the Republican Party between the Tea Party faction and its establishment wing represented by Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

True, a significant bloc of the party's establishment elected officials and business supporters such as the U.S. Chamber of Congress took concerted steps last week as the shutdown and debt-ceiling deadlines loomed to muster enough votes of GOP senators and representatives to back down from the confrontation. And they have promised to work to rein in the Tea Party's extremist influence on the party as a whole by financially backing mainstream-conservative candidates in the primaries.

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