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UTHSC’s growing interest in pharmaceutical discovery, development and manufacturing

UTHSC’s growing interest in pharmaceutical discovery, development and manufacturing

Dr. Ken Brown, executive vice chancellor and chief operations officer at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC), traveled to China earlier this month to participate in an international conference sponsored by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation to discuss international concerns related to pharmaceutical supply chain security.

The conference also focused on manufacturing practices, shipping and distribution networks, and the counterfeit pharmaceutical industry. The trip to Qingdao is described as a reflection of UTHSC's growing interests and efforts in pharmaceutical discovery, development and manufacturing.

Other global concerns discussed centered on internet pharmaceutical sales, counterfeit pharmaceutical trafficking and pharmaceutical cargo thefts, said Dr. Brown, JD, MPA, PhD, FACHE,.

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No surprise racism lurked underneath rage of mass murderer

No surprise racism lurked underneath rage of mass murderer

There was no surprise that in between U.C. Santa Barbara's mass murderer Elliot Rodger's warped, sick, and perverse harangues against women, he also laced in a generous dose of racist rage and stereotyping.

"I passed by this restaurant and I saw this black guy chilling with 4 hot white girls. He didn't even look good. Then later on in the day I was shopping at Trader Joe's and saw an Indian guy with 2 above average White Girls!!!"

He returns to these hate mongering digs at black, Hispanic and Asian-American men for having the temerity to associate with white women, and worse their reciprocation with minority men more than a few times.

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Maya Angelou: A phenomenal woman passes on

Maya Angelou: A phenomenal woman passes on

(THE ROOT) – One of the United States' most prolific and beloved authors and poets has passed away at the age of 86. Maya Angelou was a Renaissance woman whose life inspired six autobiographies, including her internationally celebrated first memoir, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings."

Ms. Angelou was found unresponsive in her Winston-Salem home. Her death comes just days after she canceled an appearance in which she was to be honored at the Major League Baseball Beacon Awards luncheon in Houston.

Born Marguerite Annie Johnson in St. Louis, Mo., on April 4, 1928, she was 3 years old when she and her brother Bailey were sent to live with their grandmother in Stamps, Ark., after their parents divorced. In that small town, she saw the evil of racial discrimination as well as the richness and faith of African-American life, both of which would play critical roles in her life and writing.

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‘Unpopular Black Opinion’ confessions

‘Unpopular Black Opinion’ confessions

There are unpopular opinions, and then there are unpopular black opinions. Have you ever been talking to your friends and let one slip? Maybe you've come out as anti-"Scandal" or, worse, turned the station when a Beyoncé song came on. The backlash that can come from speaking your truth is enough to make you worry that your proverbial black card will be revoked.

But when we asked our readers to be brave and tell us what, in their experience, #notallblackpeoplelike, they answered. From corn bread to "Real Housewives of Atlanta" to religion, these preferences pushed back on the stereotypes about African Americans. The lesson learned (again) is that the black community has never been a monolith. If you have an seemingly unpopular black opinion, you might actually be in good company.

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Malcolm X’s influence on today’s youth

Malcolm X’s influence on today’s youth

"Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today," Malcolm X stated during the Organization of Afro-American Unity's founding forum at Manhattan's Audubon Ballroom on June 28, 1964.

A caravan of grassroots activists trekked to the gravesites of Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, N.Y., on the morning of May 19th to commemorate his 89th physical day anniversary. There they were met by other admirers, some of whom had traveled from all over the country.

"This is a sacred ceremony paying respect to a martyr that died in the revolution," said moderator James Small at the beginning of the commemorative event, which was begun by Malcolm's sister Ella Collins in 1965. "He gave his life on behalf of those of us who now live. One of the reasons for coming is to say thank you and show respect to that spirit."

 

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New NAACP president says protest in his DNA

New NAACP president says protest in his DNA

When Rev. Frederick D. Haynes III of Dallas learned that the NAACP Board of Directors had chosen Cornell William Brooks over him, attorney Barbara R. Arnwine and several other better-known candidates to succeed outgoing president Benjamin Todd Jealous, his response was "Who?"

And he wasn't the only one responding that way.

In an interview from Florida, where trustees had just made their selection, a board member who asked not to be identified by name said, "We turned the whole nation into a collection of owls," he said. "When they learned of our decision, everyone in the country was saying, "Who? Who? Who?"

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8-year-old hero laid to rest

8-year-old hero laid to rest

Eight-year-old Martin Cobb and his 12-year-old sister had a special bond. They were by all accounts inseparable as siblings, best friends and playmates.

"They were never apart," said the Rev. Theodore L. Hughey, the pastor at Abundant Life Church of God in Christ, the family's church in Richmond, Va. They would ride bikes and big wheelers together, play side by side with children in their South Side neighborhood and brag about their mother's fine down-home cooking, he told the Richmond Free Press.

Marty had a special affinity for keys of any type, the pastor added. In a tragic event that has captured the nation's heart, Marty now is being fondly remembered as a courageous hero. Local and national media are telling the heart-rending story of how Marty died May 1, while bravely trying to protect his beloved sister from a sexual predator as they played around noon near railroad tracks behind the family's home in the 200 block of Brandon Road.

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