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John Doar, ex-civil rights lawyer, dies at 92

John Doar, ex-civil rights lawyer, dies at 92

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Doar, a top Justice Department civil rights lawyer in the 1960s who was at the center of key battles to protect the rights of black voters and integrate universities in the South, died Tuesday at age 92.

The cause was congestive heart failure, said his son, Burke Doar.
Doar was a Justice Department civil rights lawyer from 1960 to 1967, serving in the final months of the administration of Dwight D. Eisenhower and then staying on during the presidencies of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. He rose to the position of assistant attorney general in charge of the department's Civil Rights Division and challenged discriminatory policies in Southern states that curtailed minority access to the voting booth and state universities.

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  • Written by Eric Tucker-Associated Press
  • Category: National

Delta-driven call to action focuses on teacher effectiveness

Delta-driven call to action focuses on teacher effectiveness

(PRNewswire) – The Delta Research and Educational Foundation (DREF), partnering with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. (DST), is issuing a Call to Action for nonprofit organizations to increase the dialogue around teacher efficacy to improve educational outcomes through their Delta Teacher Efficacy Campaign (DTEC).

The campaign is made possible by a matching grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. It’s designed to enhance teacher efficacy, particularly in urban areas where disparities continue to exist for disadvantaged student subgroups. DTEC’s mission is that “Teachers Believing = Students Achieving.”

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  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom
  • Category: National

Dutch court won’t rule whether ‘Black Pete’ racist

Dutch court won’t rule whether ‘Black Pete’ racist

THE HAGUE, Netherlands — The Netherlands' highest administrative court refused Wednesday to wade into the increasingly acrimonious national debate around "Black Pete," the sidekick to the Dutch equivalent of Santa Claus.

Opponents call Pete, who is often played by white people wearing black-face makeup and a frizzy Afro wig, a racist caricature. Most Dutch people insist he is a harmless fantasy figure.

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  • Written by Mike Corder-Associated Press
  • Category: National

‘Despite our best efforts, we weren't able to save him’

‘Despite our best efforts, we weren't able to save him’

(The Root) – Dr. Martin Salia, the Maryland physician who contracted Ebola while working in Sierra Leone and was brought to Nebraska for emergency treatment on Saturday, died Monday. He was the second person to die from the disease in the United States; Thomas Eric Duncan died from the disease after traveling to Dallas from Liberia earlier this year.

Washington, D.C., CBS affiliate WNEW reports that Salia “was diagnosed with Ebola on Monday, arrived in Omaha on Saturday” and was treated at the Nebraska Medical Center’s “biocontainment unit that ha[d] successfully treated two other Ebola patients this fall.”

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  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom
  • Category: National

White House now turning to girls of color

White House now turning to girls of color

WASHINGTON — The White House is planning to focus on improving the lives of girls and women of color, after months of complaints that they were left out of the "My Brother's Keeper" initiative for young men.

White House aides planned Wednesday to release a report on the work it has done to help minority women and girls. They also plan to meet with advocates Wednesday and create a Working Group on Challenges and Opportunities for Women and Girls of Color, an offshoot of White House Council on Women and Girls, which is chaired by White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett.

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  • Written by Jesse J. Holland-Associated Press
  • Category: National

54 years later, civil rights figure says U.S. divided by race again

54 years later, civil rights figure says U.S. divided by race again

NEW ORLEANS — Ruby Bridges was 6 years old in 1960 when she became the first black student to attend a previously all-white elementary school in New Orleans, one of the iconic moments in the U.S. civil rights movement. Today, the civil rights pioneer says America looks a lot like it did then: A nation with segregated schools and racial tension.

On Friday — 54 years later to the day when she first walked up the steps to William Frantz Elementary School — she commemorates that event with the unveiling of a statue in her likeness at her old school. Also, she is reuniting with the white teacher who taught her and with the sole-surviving U.S. marshal who walked her to school.

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  • Written by Cain Burdeau-Associated Press
  • Category: National

HBCU president makes controversial remarks on rape to female students

HBCU president makes controversial remarks on rape to female students

A video posted to YouTube of a speech by Lincoln University President Robert R. Jennings has incited controversy over what some people believe are insensitive comments about rape.

During the speech, Jennings speaks of recent incidents on the college’s campus where women made false rape accusations against male companions who had spurned them after their sexual encounters.

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  • Written by theGrio
  • Category: National