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Opinion

Should Obama pay interns?

Should Obama pay interns?

NEW YORK – The White House may not be able to afford to pay its interns.

While pressure has been mounting for President Obama to pay his interns, there could be a reason why the White House hasn't pon

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  • Written by Emily Jane Fox/CNNMoney

Memphis Branch NAACP takes on toxic waste fight

Memphis Branch NAACP takes on toxic waste fight

In African-American communities across the United States, young men are besieged by violence and their families struggle to overcome economic deprivation, which threatens their way of life. In those depressed enclaves, African Americans are often relegated to poor housing conditions, and escaping such conditions has been fruitless in some cases.

But there is another threat to the African-American community that looms overhead, and in the ground water, like a modern-day plague: residue from chemical and coal burning plants. That's because African-American neighborhoods are often located in close proximity to these "killing" plants. It's happening across the United States and it's happening in Memphis and Shelby County.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) has consistently been concerned about the quality of air and water in the United States on a daily basis. Our poor African-American communities are routinely oppressed with the deadly residue from coal burning plants that is emitted in the air and found in the water supply. Memphis is not immune to this plague.

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The man black history erased

The man black history erased

On August 13, 1963, in a last ditch effort to derail the pending March on Washington, Strom Thurmond took the Senate floor and hurled a series of vicious, personal attacks against the man organizing the largest protest in U.S. history.

Thurmond called him a Communist and a draft dodger.

He brought up a previous arrest and accused him of being immoral and a pervert.

The man Thurmond was attacking was not Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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  • Written by LZ Granderson/CNN

Why we’re still marching

Why we’re still marching

For a while, it looked like the 50th anniversary observance of the March on Washington would expose a sharp split in the Civil Rights Movement. Al Sharpton jumped ahead of his colleagues by cornering Martin Luther King III and the two of them announced a March on Washington for Saturday, August 24.

Other civil rights leaders were planning events around that time and complained privately that Sharpton and Martin III had locked up key funding from major labor groups, a primary source of funding for the movement.

A series of high-profile events – the Supreme Court's decision in Shelby County v. Holder gutting the heart of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, remanding a University of Texas affirmative action case back to the appellate level for stricter scrutiny and George Zimmerman being found not guilty of second-degree murder in connection with the shooting death of 17-year-old unarmed Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. – left African-Americans and their supporters clamoring for an outlet to express their disgust.

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  • Written by George Curry

For Republicans, ‘brand’ problem is not brand new

For Republicans, ‘brand’ problem is not brand new

During the past year, we have watched monumental change take place all over the world; not just in terms of democracy, but in terms of culture, law, and politics, etc.

Our major institutions have not been immune from this change that is sweeping across the globe. There has been a major push to redefine what a family is; we have redefined marriage; we have redefined sexuality—no longer is there male or female, now there is other; there are now gay Christians; we now have Christian gangsta rappers, etc.

Everything seems to be changing other than the Republicans approach to engaging the black community.

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  • Written by Raynard Jackson/NNPA

Will the Senate change Cory Booker?

Will the Senate change Cory Booker?

WASHINGTON – Cory Booker already had a national identity before he decided to run for senator.

The media-savvy, tweet-happy mayor from Newark – who easily won the New Jersey Democratic primary for Senate last Tuesday – has been known for his man-of-the-people streak, charismatic presence and social media intensity, or as some say, fixation.

But can he make the switch from a nationally popular hands-on mayor to the contentious spotlight of the United States Senate?

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  • Written by Dan Merica/CNN

Is Bloomberg racist, sexist or clueless?

Is Bloomberg racist, sexist or clueless?

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg had a tough week. At least, tough compared to most weeks for the white, straight male billionaire who runs one of the world's leading cities, and by most accounts has led a fairly charmed life that usually involves getting his way – even if that means paying for the privilege.

But the Bloomberg who has been praised in progressive circles for his advocacy on gun control is in danger of having his legacy eclipsed by another Bloomberg who does not inspire progressive admiration, but shame. The mayor's obsession with maintaining stop and frisk, a policy that both civil rights activists and a federal judge have deemed discriminatory in execution, a conclusion that all data collected on the subject supports, has cast him as someone who is racially insensitive at best, and subtly racist at worst.

Now his reaction to the recent ruling by federal judge Shira Scheindlin, who found stop and frisk unconstitutional, is renewing questions of whether or not the mayor is not only racially insensitive but also insensitive when it comes to gender issues.

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Why don’t you have any black friends?

Why don’t you have any black friends?

(CNN) – "So, how many black friends do you have now?"

It's a question I get asked a lot, ever since I set out five years ago to find out why I, your typical middle-class white person, had no black friends at all.

I do have black friends now, actually. Several. But I rarely offer that information when asked, because to ask white people how many black friends they have is to pose the wrong question.

Recently, a Reuters poll came out showing that 40 percent of white Americans have zero nonwhite friends, and only 20 percent of white Americans have five or more nonwhite friends. People seemed shocked that the numbers were so bad.

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  • Written by Tanner Colby

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