facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

Opinion

Black men in pain need our help

Black men in pain need our help

"I was suicidal in college," a Harry Potter-looking hipster recently told me. The young man's words stunned me. It wasn't his age or gender or style that took me by surprise. It was because he's black

Read more...

  • Written by Michaela Angela Davis/Special to CNN

5 ways Obamacare benefits African-American women

5 ways Obamacare benefits African-American women

For the last few weeks, America has been told to brace itself for what is being billed as one of the biggest threats to hit the country in years: the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

A brief overview of some recent fearmongering headlines: "Obamacare Is Really, Really Bad for You, Especially If You're Young," "Sorry, Mr. President, There Is 'Serious Evidence' Obamacare Is Bad for Economic Growth" and "Obamacare – What's Already Gone Wrong."

But despite the scary headlines, there are some serious benefits to the new law, particularly for those in communities of color. The effects that the Affordable Care Act will have on African-American women are particularly noteworthy. Below is a list of five ways Obamacare significantly benefits black women.

Read more...

Donna Brazile takes on food stamp critics

Donna Brazile takes on food stamp critics

After the vote in the House of Representatives to slash the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, I wrote a column against cutting food stamps. This column generated more than 5,200 online comments and hundreds of e-mails.

Comments reflected, not surprisingly, the tone and tenor of the political debate: a lot of partisan passion, some mutual understanding, animosity based on stereotypes and a lot of misinformation.

I would like to address some of the typical concerns that were expressed.

Read more...

  • Written by Donna Brazile/CNN

Lamar Odom’s downward spiral a familiar tale

Lamar Odom’s downward spiral a familiar tale

Watching an athlete's career slowly spiral out of control has become a familiar, and unfortunately rather common, story.

We remember the tragic cases of the great ones. Lawrence Taylor's battle with substance abuse (and to a larger extent, himself) is the standard example of watching an athlete fans revered, turn into a man fans revile. We never got to see the greatness of Len Bias, because a cocaine overdose robbed him of what should've been a Hall of Fame career.

These past three years, we've seen the slow and steady decline of the promising career of Lamar Odom. The news items around him have morphed from humorous, to perplexing, to simply depressing. After the latest Odom news – that he lashed out at his absentee father on Twitter for failing him as a child – it's fair to wonder if the next time we hear his name in the news, it'll be for an appearance in a courtroom, rather than on a basketball court. At 33 – ancient by NBA terms – Odom's professional basketball career is probably over.

Read more...

Food stamp cuts kick Americans when they’re down

Food stamp cuts kick Americans when they’re down

We are in the middle of a fight to preserve the dignity and grace that makes all of us Americans. We have big hearts and great souls. I know. I have seen them, felt them and watched them in wonder when my family was lost and unreachable in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

I cried, worrying for those I loved, heartbroken by what happened to our beloved Louisiana. And in the middle of that tough moment, the decency of people shone through in e-mails, phone calls and in person. Everybody was saying the same thing: "How can I help?"

This is what we do in times of struggle. We offer our hand and our love to pull someone up who's been knocked down by hard times and despair. It's just a fundamental rule in life and in any fight; you don't kick people when they're down.

Read more...

President Obama still the ‘tough guy’ after Syrian deal

President Obama still the ‘tough guy’ after Syrian deal

In any movie, TV show or book, the toughest guy is always the one that never actually has to draw his weapon. In old western movies, you always knew who the tough guy was, he just walked into the bar and everybody started finishing their drinks and running.

You watch "The Wire" and all somebody had to yell was "Omar's coming" and folks scattered. By the time Samuel L. Jackson shows up in any scene most people are already looking for an escape route (even the snakes).

The point is, that in the movies, just like real life, the tough guy is the one who makes things happen without having to lift a finger; his mere presence or even the vaguest threat is enough to get things done.

Read more...

  • Written by Jason Johnson

Aaron Alexis was someone’s son

Aaron Alexis was someone’s son

In 1963, President Kennedy submitted a "Special Message to the Congress on Mental Illness and Mental Retardation" with a plan to call to action private foundations, individual citizens and government agencies on all levels to act responsibly in addressing the needs of this population...50 years later where are we.

Those suffering from mental illness may not be "prisoners" in the mental institutions or insane asylums, but they are prisoners in their own worlds...the stigma, lack of resources and difficulty navigating a complex health care system perpetuate the problems of yesterday.

When will we address the way we are raising our young black men? When will we take time to talk to our friends and neighbors? When will we stop being scared and get involved? When will we become the village it takes to raise a child? Can we stop saying when and start saying now.

Read more...

Subcategories