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In the South, the Obamacare debate continues, even as law insures thousands

In the South, the Obamacare debate continues, even as law insures thousands

FRANKFORT, Ky.—In one of the poorest areas of Appalachia, about 2500 people have signed up to get health insurance over the last six months – a number that represents more than a tenth of Clay County's residents.

One hundred and twenty miles way, the county's state senator, Robert Stivers, is laying out his plans to gradually gut the Affordable Care Act in Kentucky, which provided his constituents with insurance. The soft-spoken 52-year-old Republican is hardly a fiery Tea Party type: he first joined the state legislature back in 1997 and slowly rose through the ranks to become the state Senate president. In a mid-March interview in a small room just off the floor of the Senate in Kentucky's Capitol building, Stivers acknowledged that Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear had handled the rollout of Obama's health-care law smoothly in this state and that some people in his district now have health insurance for the first time.

Stivers, though, is unmoved. The Affordable Care Act, he says, is "unsustainable" in the long run. If Republicans can gain more seats in the state legislature here over the next year, he said, they will look to peel back Kentucky's participation in the health-care law by limiting the expansion of Medicaid in the state.

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The Iconic Living Legends Award

The Iconic Living Legends Award

The Iconic Living Legends Awards Ceremony and Exhibit – scheduled to coincide with National Women's History Month – was held recently on Langston University's Oklahoma City campus.

The Iconic Living Legends Award salutes women who have had an iconic impact on the progress of women. This year's honorees included Lelia Foley-Davis, who became the first African-American woman elected mayor in the United States when she was elected mayor of Taft, Okla. on April 3, 1973.

During her acceptance speech, Foley-Davis took the audience back in time for a glimpse of the past and then reflected on the success and progress that she said so many have had a hand in fostering She brought to life episodes of difficulty and depression, detailing barriers created by whites and blacks. She also emphasized how hard people worked to overcome the obstacles.

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African Americans locked out of housing market

African Americans locked out of housing market

WASHINGTON – As the housing market recovers a new report by the Urban Institute shows that African-American borrowers "have been disproportionately shut out of the market."

According to the report titled, "Where Have All the Loans Gone? The Impact of Credit Availability on Mortgage Volume," the share of African-American borrowers was 6 percent in 2001 but fell to 4.8 percent in 2012. By contrast, the share of white borrowers increased more than 3 percent from 2001 to 2012 and now account for 71.2 percent of mortgage loans.

From 2001 to 2012, the number of loans that went to African-American borrowers decreased by 55 percent while the number of loans to whites dropped 41 percent, with most of the losses occurring after 2005.

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No such thing as too much love

No such thing as too much love

Is it possible for your baby to become too attached to you?

That's the question many parents may find themselves pondering at some point during their child's first years. Mothers and fathers can often confuse being attentive to a newborn or toddler's needs with smothering or spoiling the child.

There is a widespread sentiment that too much warmth and affection will lead to a child who is too needy or 'clingy'. But according to experts, this notion is false.

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ACT Report: Many African-American students inadequately prepared for postsecondary education

ACT Report: Many African-American students inadequately prepared for postsecondary education

Nearly all African-American students report that they aspire to earn a postsecondary degree, but most are inadequately prepared to succeed in their first-year courses in college, degree or certificate programs, according to a report released today by ACT.

The report, The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2013: African American Students, shows that only 10 percent of African-American 2013 high school graduates met at least three of four ACT College Readiness Benchmarks, compared to 39 percent for all ACT-tested graduates.

The research-based ACT College Readiness Benchmarks specify the minimum scores students must earn on each of ACT's four subject tests (English, mathematics, reading, and science) to have about a 75 percent chance of earning a grade of C or higher in a typical credit-bearing first-year college course in the corresponding subject area. ACT research suggests that students who meet the benchmarks are more likely than those who do not to persist in college and earn a degree.

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The ‘tanning of America’ spreads to film and television industries

The ‘tanning of America’ spreads to film and television industries

2013 was a banner year for diversity in the movies, both on-screen and in audiences.

In a year that saw the success of films such as "Lee Daniel's 'The Butler,'" "12 Years a Slave," and "Best Man Holiday," the MPAA reports that minority attendance also saw a surge.

Black movie attendance jumped by 13 percent in 2013, with 170 million movie tickets being sold to African-American filmgoers. And though African-Americans only make up 12 percent of the U.S. population, they made up 13 percent of the movie-going audience in 2013. (Latinos, who make up 17 percent of the population, accounted for 25 percent of movie ticket sales.)

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Extra time for some to finish health care enrollment

Extra time for some to finish health care enrollment

The Obama administration has announced that extra time will be granted after the March 31 deadline for consumers to complete enrollment in an insurance plan under the health care law, the Associated Press reports.

"We are experiencing a surge in demand and are making sure that we will be ready to help consumers who may be in line by the deadline to complete enrollment, either online or over the phone," Health and Human Services spokesman Aaron Albright told AP.

Officials told AP that extensions will be allowed on the honor system, requiring only that applicants attest that special circumstances or complex cases prevented them from finishing their enrollment by March 31.

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