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The silent wars of African-American girls

The silent wars of African-American girls

WASHINGTON – March 1st was the last time eight-year-old Relisha Rudd was seen, leaving a local hotel here with Kahlil Tatum, a 51-year-old custodian who had been tasked to babysit her. Exactly a month later, Tatum was found dead; Rudd remains missing and the trail has gone cold.

The same week Tatum's death was announced, the body of 30-year-old, first-year medical resident Teleka Patrick was pulled from a lake in Indiana. In the days leading up to her December disappearance, she and others expressed concern over her mental health. The circumstances of her death remain unclear.

One week after Patrick's body was found, 22-year-old Karyn Washington, founder of For Brown Girls, a well-known blog dedicated to combatting colorism and promoting self-love for Black women, was found dead in an apparent suicide.

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New tobacco ‘apology’ ads plan still excludes most black media

New tobacco ‘apology’ ads plan still excludes most black media

WASHINGTON – A revised plan for major tobacco companies to purchase court-ordered ads to admit that they deliberately misled the public about the dangers of smoking would add nine white-owned newspapers to the list of publications carrying tobacco 'apology' ads but shut out more than 90 percent of black newspapers and all Black-owned radio and television stations, according to documents filed in federal court.

"If they had asked, we could have helped them develop a better plan than this," said National Newspaper Publishers Association Chairman Cloves Campbell. "They didn't consult us and the end result is that we're back to where this process started last year. What they have put on the table is totally unacceptable."

If the NNPA files a motion in opposition to the revised plan, as expected, the judge has a number of options from which to choose, including making a final decision on the merits of the case or ordering the defendants to come up with a more comprehensive plan.

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Millennials are more diverse – in many ways

Millennials are more diverse – in many ways

Millennials are easy to spot. They're the ones welded to their handheld devices, touting peculiar professional titles and ambitions. Born between 1980 and the early 2000s, Millennials, or Generation Y, are entitled, lazy, self-centered, and callow, according to popular perception.

It's true, this generation is different – but not for those oft-repeated gloomy reasons.

As a new report from the Pew Center titled, "Millennials in Adulthood: Detached from Institutions, Networked with Friends," demonstrates, most of the members of the Millennial generation were born into an American landscape that is vastly different from that of Generation X, Baby Boomers, and the Silent Generation.

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‘Oldest African-American living in Elaine, Ark.’ is a world-class woman of excellence

‘Oldest African-American living in Elaine, Ark.’ is a world-class woman of excellence

She has lived more than the Bible's promise of three scores and 10. In fact, Sarah Jackson Bobo, born April 28, 1924, in Hookpur, Ark., is poised to celebrate yet another milestone. On Sunday, April 27th, her children will help celebrate her 90th birthday at the Double Tree by Hilton Hotel at 185 Union Ave..

"My mother has lived almost a century," said Derome Bobo Sr., the 11th of his mother's 17 children and chairperson of the Sarah Jackson Bobo birthday gala. She birthed five daughters and 12 sons. One of them, Sgt. Edward Lee Bobo, was killed in August 1967 while serving his last tour of duty in the Vietnam War. He was scheduled for discharge that year in October.

"She's the oldest remaining member of the family and, I believe, the oldest African-American living in Elaine, Ark. She only has cousins left, and she's the oldest of them all," said Bobo, operations manager for the Memphis Postal Service.

 

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  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Category: News

April is National Minority Health Month

April is National Minority Health Month

(PRNewswire) – April is National Minority Health Month, which provides a platform from which to pitch the message that some minorities have higher incidences of serious chronic diseases than the U.S. population at large, making regular check-ups and good health management for these groups critical.

In particular, high blood pressure or hypertension, kidney disease and diabetes strike larger segments of certain minorities than of the general population, according to Ronald Charles, M.D., vice president of medical affairs for Buckeye Community Health Plan (BCHP) BCHP. The 2010 U.S. Census indicates that approximately 36 percent of the population belongs to a racial or ethnic minority group.

"Studies show that lack of access to health care, poverty, and cultural attitudes and behaviors are barriers to preventive care and disease management for some minority Americans," Dr. Charles said.

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Mental illness is our dirty little secret

Mental illness is our dirty little secret

I'm tired, my sisterfriend says. I don't know how much longer I can hold on. As I hear her I have a couple of choices. One is to tell her to get with her pastor and pray; the other is to tell her to get real with her illness. Running her to her pastor takes her to a familiar place. Pushing her to help takes her out of her comfort zone.

When my beloved brothers and sisters share that they are stymied in the way they live their lives, I don't mind praying and encouraging spiritual counsel, but I do mind ignoring the medicinal help that could assist my sisterfriend.

So my sister is sighing her pain, and I am wondering what to do. There are few that will hear a black woman in a black community, strumming her pain, questioning her faith. According to the National Associations of Mental Health more than 4 percent of African Americans have considered suicide. Most of them are African-American women.

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  • Written by Julianne Malveaux
  • Category: News

Apple vs. Pears: Which is really the healthiest shape?

Apple vs. Pears: Which is really the healthiest shape?

For years and years and years now, women have used two particular pieces of fruit to define their body shape – and, to a certain extent, their health risks.

An apple shape, where body fat tends to be stored mostly around the waist, is typically considered to be an indicator of higher health risks, especially heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

A pear shape, where body fat tends to be stored mostly around the hips and thighs, is generally considered to be "safer."

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