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Millennials are more diverse – in many ways

Millennials are more diverse – in many ways

Millennials are easy to spot. They're the ones welded to their handheld devices, touting peculiar professional titles and ambitions. Born between 1980 and the early 2000s, Millennials, or Generation Y, are entitled, lazy, self-centered, and callow, according to popular perception.

It's true, this generation is different – but not for those oft-repeated gloomy reasons.

As a new report from the Pew Center titled, "Millennials in Adulthood: Detached from Institutions, Networked with Friends," demonstrates, most of the members of the Millennial generation were born into an American landscape that is vastly different from that of Generation X, Baby Boomers, and the Silent Generation.

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‘Oldest African-American living in Elaine, Ark.’ is a world-class woman of excellence

‘Oldest African-American living in Elaine, Ark.’ is a world-class woman of excellence

She has lived more than the Bible's promise of three scores and 10. In fact, Sarah Jackson Bobo, born April 28, 1924, in Hookpur, Ark., is poised to celebrate yet another milestone. On Sunday, April 27th, her children will help celebrate her 90th birthday at the Double Tree by Hilton Hotel at 185 Union Ave..

"My mother has lived almost a century," said Derome Bobo Sr., the 11th of his mother's 17 children and chairperson of the Sarah Jackson Bobo birthday gala. She birthed five daughters and 12 sons. One of them, Sgt. Edward Lee Bobo, was killed in August 1967 while serving his last tour of duty in the Vietnam War. He was scheduled for discharge that year in October.

"She's the oldest remaining member of the family and, I believe, the oldest African-American living in Elaine, Ark. She only has cousins left, and she's the oldest of them all," said Bobo, operations manager for the Memphis Postal Service.

 

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  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Category: News

April is National Minority Health Month

April is National Minority Health Month

(PRNewswire) – April is National Minority Health Month, which provides a platform from which to pitch the message that some minorities have higher incidences of serious chronic diseases than the U.S. population at large, making regular check-ups and good health management for these groups critical.

In particular, high blood pressure or hypertension, kidney disease and diabetes strike larger segments of certain minorities than of the general population, according to Ronald Charles, M.D., vice president of medical affairs for Buckeye Community Health Plan (BCHP) BCHP. The 2010 U.S. Census indicates that approximately 36 percent of the population belongs to a racial or ethnic minority group.

"Studies show that lack of access to health care, poverty, and cultural attitudes and behaviors are barriers to preventive care and disease management for some minority Americans," Dr. Charles said.

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Mental illness is our dirty little secret

Mental illness is our dirty little secret

I'm tired, my sisterfriend says. I don't know how much longer I can hold on. As I hear her I have a couple of choices. One is to tell her to get with her pastor and pray; the other is to tell her to get real with her illness. Running her to her pastor takes her to a familiar place. Pushing her to help takes her out of her comfort zone.

When my beloved brothers and sisters share that they are stymied in the way they live their lives, I don't mind praying and encouraging spiritual counsel, but I do mind ignoring the medicinal help that could assist my sisterfriend.

So my sister is sighing her pain, and I am wondering what to do. There are few that will hear a black woman in a black community, strumming her pain, questioning her faith. According to the National Associations of Mental Health more than 4 percent of African Americans have considered suicide. Most of them are African-American women.

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  • Written by Julianne Malveaux
  • Category: News

Apple vs. Pears: Which is really the healthiest shape?

Apple vs. Pears: Which is really the healthiest shape?

For years and years and years now, women have used two particular pieces of fruit to define their body shape – and, to a certain extent, their health risks.

An apple shape, where body fat tends to be stored mostly around the waist, is typically considered to be an indicator of higher health risks, especially heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

A pear shape, where body fat tends to be stored mostly around the hips and thighs, is generally considered to be "safer."

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Teen hides in wheel well of plane and survives 5-hour flight

Teen hides in wheel well of plane and survives 5-hour flight

A 16-year-old boy who had a fight with his parents is "lucky to be alive" after he stowed away in a plane's wheel well and flew from California to Hawaii surviving a lack of oxygen and cold temperatures at 38,000 feet and, the Associated Press reports.

"Doesn't even remember the flight," FBI spokesman Tom Simon in Honolulu told the Associated Press on Sunday night. "It's amazing he survived that."

Simon told AP that security footage from the San Jose airport confirmed that the Santa Clara, Calif., teen climbed a fence to get to Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45 on Sunday morning.

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‘Hurricane’ Carter went to the mat for the wrongfully accused

‘Hurricane’ Carter went to the mat for the wrongfully accused

With the death of Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, we have lost a great fighter in the ring and a powerful advocate for the wrongfully convicted. In many ways, he helped open the eyes of many to the injustices of a system that far too often throws innocent people behind bars.

Carter knew firsthand about the plight of the wrongly accused because he had spent 19 years behind bars for crimes he did not commit. He and co-defendant John Artis were charged with a triple murder at the Lafayette Grill in Paterson, New Jersey in 1966. There was little physical evidence in the case, and the so-called eyewitnesses who testified against them were two convicted felons. And Carter and Artis maintained their innocence and passed a lie detector test. However, an all-white jury found them guilty. Carter was sentenced to three life sentences.

A victim of an unfair trial with corrupt prosecutors who originally sought the death penalty, Hurricane Carter was released after two decades in prison, including time in solitary confinement. A federal judge found that the prosecution of his case was "predicated upon an appeal to racism rather than reason, and concealment rather than disclosure." Specifically, "the jury was permitted to draw inferences of guilt based solely upon the race" of the defendants, according to the judge.

 

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