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‘Deadline’ Memphis – Monday, February 27

 

Civil rights activist attorneys Larry Woods and D’Army Bailey will unite once again in Memphis, a hotbed of drama during the turbulent ’60s.

Civil rights activist attorneys Larry Woods and D’Army Bailey will unite once again in Memphis, a hotbed of drama during the turbulent ’60s. Only this time, it won’t be a protest march in the street or a legal dogfight in a courtroom.

 
 D’Army Bailey

The two will take to the big screen in “Deadline,” a movie based on real events about the murder of an African-American teenage boy in Amos, Ala., by an angry Klansman. Woods is a native of Nashville. Attorney and former judge Bailey is Memphis’ own.

Hundreds are expected to attend a red-carpet premiere of the feature film at the Wolfchase 8 Galleria on Monday (Feb. 27). Bailey will take a stroll down the crimson walkway, along with Hollywood’s Steve Talley and Academy-Award nominated Eric Roberts, who star in the docu-drama.

“I have acted in a number of movies,” said Bailey. “But this experience – being a part of creating this film – felt so authentic. All the characters brought a richness and sense of humanity in telling this story of young Wallace Sampson, who was killed by a Ku Klux Klansman simply because he was black. All the actors made rich, personal contributions to the set.”

 
 In ‘Deadline,’ an African-American teenager in Amos, Ala. is shot with a deer rifle and left dead on the street. Memphis attorney D’Army Bailey plays the judge in the trial that unfolds 20 years later in the movie that is based on real events. (Courtesy photo)

 
Bailey plays the presiding judge in the trial of Sampson’s alleged murderer who has eluded prosecution for two decades. The actual court scenes were shot in the antiquated courthouse of Pulaski, Tenn., founding city of the Ku Klux Klan.

“As I waited for my scenes, I sat next door in a small courtroom. I quietly reflected on what must have gone on here. All the crimes against blacks that went unanswered; all the people so long ago who had no legal protection against lynching and other racial cruelty.

“Amos, Alabama was pretty much like that for young Wallace, too. He was shot with a deer rifle and left dead on the street. The murder went uninvestigated, unsolved, and unpunished until justice spoke 20 years later. This role was so close to home, so real and authentic to me. It is a project in which I am extremely proud. Not just an acting job – ‘Deadlines’ was life-changing for me.”

The film’s director, Curt Hahn, called the 95-minute saga “a Christian film about truth and redemption.”

“Our film has been compared to the great classic, ‘To Kill A Mockingbird,’” said Hahn. “To even be named in the same breath as this landmark film is an extreme honor. I am just so humbled and grateful to have been a part of this.”

“Deadline” is being released in a 42-city tour across the country.

“A portion of the proceeds from the film will be given to charity,” said Hahn. “Already, more than $30,000 has been raised for non-profits. The Memphis premiere will benefit Stax Music Academy.”

For more information and tickets, call the Wolfchase 8 Galleria at 901-681-2020. The red carpet event will begin at 6 p.m.


 

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