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Faith, education and hard work yield promising future for Joshua Hawkins

joshua 600Joshua Hawkins, an outstanding student and athlete at Memphis University School, looks forward to a promising future.

The 18-year-old high school senior has been accepted at four elite Ivy League Colleges – Yale, Harvard, Princeton and Brown. If he doesn't choose from that quartet, Vanderbilt University and the University of Michigan also want him.

Representing the fourth generation of the Church of God in Christ, Hawkins is the son of Temple of Deliverance COGIC Pastor Milton R. Hawkins and first lady Catherine C. Hawkins.

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Amnesty for illegals can’t be defended

raynarrd 600I am totally perplexed by Republicans who advocate amnesty for those who entered the U.S. illegally. We Republicans are supposed to be the party of law and order, a party that stands on clearly defined principles. Let's cut through the pompous rhetoric: The issue of amnesty is only about cheap labor. All the other arguments are merely background noise.

With the national unemployment rate just under eight percent, how can you argue that illegals are doing jobs that Americans refuse to do? With all the unemployed engineers (partly because of the shutdown of NASA's Space Shuttle program), how do you justify increasing the number of H-1B visas? The special visa allows companies to temporarily employ foreign workers in specialty occupations for up to six years. How can six years still be considered temporary?

How do you explain to a kid in Virginia that he or she has to pay out-of-state tuition to attend the University of Maryland while a student in the country illegally is allowed to pay in-state tuition? Why should someone in the country illegally be able to obtain a benefit that even an American citizen can't have? Aren't these Republicans supporting discrimination against American citizens in their lust of the Hispanic voter?

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No, after the Schuette case, Affirmative Action isn’t going to be OK

aabill 600Above the Law's Elie Mystal doesn't think that affirmative action supporters need to hyperventilate over Tuesday's Supreme Court decision in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action—which upheld Michigan's ban on race-conscious admissions policies at state colleges—because, he writes, the justices, in fact, "didn't rule that affirmative action is unconstitutional."

And indeed, they didn't—not this time, anyway.

Short term, all the court said was that it didn't violate 14th Amendment equal protection when Michigan voters did away with race-conscious admissions.

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Are U.S. schools becoming more segregated again?

SchoolSegregation 600Nearly sixty years have passed since the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education, which prohibited Southern states from segregating schools by race.

The Court's decision in Brown sparked a disruption of white supremacy and Jim Crow in the South and forced the federal government to pass civil and voting rights legislation.

However, a new report by the Economic Policy Institute makes the argument that while the 1954 Supreme Court decision did achieve the goal of raising awareness about the inherent segregation and unfairness in the separate but equal concept, it has failed miserably at its central mission: to desegregate schools in the United States.

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April is National Minority Health Month

diabetes 600(PRNewswire) – April is National Minority Health Month, which provides a platform from which to pitch the message that some minorities have higher incidences of serious chronic diseases than the U.S. population at large, making regular check-ups and good health management for these groups critical.

In particular, high blood pressure or hypertension, kidney disease and diabetes strike larger segments of certain minorities than of the general population, according to Ronald Charles, M.D., vice president of medical affairs for Buckeye Community Health Plan (BCHP) BCHP. The 2010 U.S. Census indicates that approximately 36 percent of the population belongs to a racial or ethnic minority group.

"Studies show that lack of access to health care, poverty, and cultural attitudes and behaviors are barriers to preventive care and disease management for some minority Americans," Dr. Charles said.

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