facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

Opinion

We stand together – lack and brown – for the youth in Chicago and Central America

We stand together – lack and brown – for the youth in Chicago and Central America
Last week The Root’s Keli Goff wrote about the child refugees fleeing violence and poverty in Central America and seeking refuge at our border. Unfortunately, she argued that we shouldn’t protect these brown children, and supports deporting them – while claiming that we have our own black children to care about first, citing recent violence in the streets of Chicago.
 
Well, we are those black and brown children she’s talking about.

Read more...

Deciphering the new game in tech: Do businesses value diversity?

Deciphering the new game in tech: Do businesses value diversity?
Vast wealth, massive disruption, formidable power — these are just the few of the big-ticket prizes behind some of the doors of the high stakes game known as the tech industry.
 
For many years, it has been an exclusive, members-only sort of sector but now, new players try to shoulder their way in to a seat at a table brimming with abundance.  There’s a new breeze beginning to blow in the thin, exclusive air of the tech giants’ offices in this country, and the direction seems to be that of a call to action for diversity. But with just as many complexities as entrants, how things will truly shake out in the long run is almost anyone’s guess.

Read more...

How to raise a financially responsible child

How to raise a financially responsible child

Two weeks ago I handed my son his first debit card for his own bank account. Since he’s 15 years old, I figured it was time for him to control his own money. For the past couple of years he’s received a minimal allowance, which he’s never complained about. Most kids would scoff at $20 a week, but not him. Every time I handed him a $20, you’d think he’d just received $100.

But what he didn’t know was that technically he was earning $40 a week for the errands he’s required to do. For the last several years the extra $20 he wasn’t getting was going directly into his account.

Read more...

Longer safe-haven times for moms might have kept babies safe from harm

Longer safe-haven times for moms might have kept babies safe from harm

Two recent stories captured headlines and broke hearts across the nation. A 7-month-old baby was abandoned in a New York subway station and another baby died, allegedly suffocated by his mother at just 11 months old. Though the stories had different endings, both are tragedies, and in each case, the babies were being brought up by young mothers who were in over their heads and – in acts of apparent desperation – made choices that will haunt them the rest of their lives.

My point isn’t to condone the alleged actions of these two women. But it is to raise a question: If we as a society accept that there are people who become parents every day who aren’t ready for parenthood, why don’t we provide more options to help keep their children healthy and safe?

Read more...

No easy answers exist with immigration reform

No easy answers exist with immigration reform
Twenty-thousand-eight-hundred-and-five unaccompanied minors from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras were caught entering the United States illegally in 2013. Of that number, 1,169 were repatriated. So far this year, 57,000 unaccompanied children from those same three countries have been caught coming across the border, and 1,500, at most, have been deported.
 
Given those odds, it might be worth the trip.
 
President Barack Obama’s public message that kids won’t be allowed to stay in the United States has at this point fallen on deaf Central American ears, and the kids keep arriving daily. He’s now asking Congress for $3.7 billion in emergency funds to deal with the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border.  But only a tiny fraction of that money would go where it’s desperately needed.

Read more...

What the book ‘Place, Not Race’ doesn’t get

What the book ‘Place, Not Race’ doesn’t get
I vividly remember the affirmative action debates that raged on my campus when I was a college student in the early ’90s. Many of our debates centered on Stephen L. Carter’s “Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby.” To me, Carter was a person who had benefited from his inclusion in formerly all-white spaces who had suddenly turned on my generation as we were attempting to set down our own roots in a wider, post-civil-rights America. Others felt that we were taking advantage of something we had not earned.
 
I read Carter’s book as a betrayal. Not only had I earned my scores and achievements, but I also felt as though I more than deserved a place at the University of Virginia, precisely because of its history: My “home” in the “academical village” was literally built by my ancestors. This centurieslong history enriched my quest to learn everything I could at a university that had once barred black Americans and women.

Read more...

Yes, immigrant kids are fleeing violence, but so were kids in Chicago last weekend

Yes, immigrant kids are fleeing violence, but so were kids in Chicago last weekend
 
Incensed by President Barack Obama’s plan to deport thousands of immigrant children who have arrived in the U.S. illegally in recent months, activists have taken to the streets to chide the president. Many protests have included children. At one, a young boy can be seen carrying a sign that reads, “No deportation of children fleeing violence and poverty.”
 
I, too, care about children facing violence and poverty, and that’s why I support the Obama administration’s plan to expedite deportations.

Read more...

Subcategories