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Thu04242014

Opinion

Foods to chase away high blood sugar blues

More than 60 million Americans suffer from diabetes or pre-diabetes, and that number is sure to double or triple in a few years.
 
 Dr. Timothy Moore

More than 60 million Americans suffer from diabetes or pre-diabetes, and that number is sure to double or triple in a few years. This is an alarming fact that poses one particular question: What foods can I eat to curtail the onslaught of diabetes or pre-diabetes?

I’m sure the aforementioned question is not one that sufferers haven’t asked their doctor, who commonly subscribes medication and no doubt a checklist of foods to eat and foods not to eat. So the key to warding off diabetes, or returning the body to some normalcy, is to eat a healthy nutritional diet.

Let’s start here: Where does blood glucose come from? Blood glucose accumulates in the blood stream from eating too many carbohydrates. It’s also a fact that saturated fats can impact insulin sensitivity and cause blood glucose levels to spike.

We can control blood glucose levels by reducing the consumption of high-calorie, processed foods. Foods such as fried chicken, hot dogs, potato chips, cookies, sugars, sugary juices, fructose, sucrose and others are sensitive to the body and cause blood glucose levels to spike.

The most important meal for controlling blood glucose is breakfast. Some people miss breakfast altogether, or breakfast may not be as important. But breakfast is essential in regulating blood sugars, because the cells need fuel to function.

A good simple breakfast could consist of oatmeal with grapefruit, brown rice with an apple, oak waffles, tofu scramblers in the place of eggs, rye or wheat toast, raw vegetables, and a green vegetable smoothie made with kale, celery and cucumbers. And if possible, a 30-minute walk will do the body wonders.

Now we’ll deal with lunch, which comes and goes fast. Don’t worry about those quick and handy fast food restaurants. You shouldn’t eat the food anyway. The ideal lunch is a fresh green garden salad without dressing, but with fresh lemon juice, sweet potato and lentil soup.

Black bean soft tacos are good too; they’re great and easy to make. Try tofu sour cream on your tacos. It’s healthier. The ingredients are: 1 package (12.3 ounces) reduced-fat, extra-firm silken tofu crumbled, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, ½ teaspoon sugar, Taco, 8 corn tortillas (6), 1½ cups of vegetarian refried beans made with black beans, or just make your own, 2 cups of low fat guacamole, make your own, 1 cup of no-sugar added salsa, 4 cups of finely shredded green cabbage or lettuce, and 1 cup of tofu sour cream.

For tofu sour cream: place the tofu and lemon juice in a food processor, or blender, and process until very smooth. Refrigerate in a covered container for up to one week. For the taco: heat the tortillas, spread about 3 tablespoons of beans down the middle of each tortilla, top with guacamole, salsa, cabbage, or lettuce, and tofu sour cream. You should notice your blood sugar teetering around normal.

When understanding blood glucose, we must understand how exercise boosts your immune system. This is often a part that’s left out in controlling our blood sugar. No matter how good you’re eating program, or your dietary program, you won’t get the desired results that you’re after unless you incorporate a true exercise program in your daily routine.

A recent study from Hong Kong showed that exercising at low to moderate frequency causes lower influenza associated with mortality. People who exercise at moderate frequency – from once a month to three times per week – had a lower death rate compared to people who never exercise or seldom exercised.

Also, another study conducted by the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash., discovered that moderate intensity exercise reduced the incidence of colds among hundreds, including 15 overweight, obese, previously sedentary, postmenopausal women. The exercise regimen consisted of moderate exercises five days per week, for 12 months.

The bottom line: A lifestyle low in saturated fats and carbohydrates, which are mostly processed, and some form of moderate-to-light exercise seem to be beneficial in controlling blood glucose levels.

The outcome: Do the things you know are beneficial to your overall health, and enjoy life.

(Dr. Timothy Moore teaches nutrition, heart disease and diabetes reversal through a plant-based lifestyle. He is a professional speaker, wellness coach and personal plant-based chef. He can be reached by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.cheftimothymoore.com or www.twitter.com/cheftimmoore.)

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