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Boko Haram: ‘Bring Back Our Army’

Boko Haram: ‘Bring Back Our Army’
Boko Haram, the Islamic terrorist group that has been in the spotlight since abducting more than 200 schoolgirls from Chibok, Nigeria, in April, is once again drawing attention to itself, releasing a

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  • Written by Breanna Edwards-The Root
  • Category: National

The Links, Incorporated elects its 16th national president

The Links, Incorporated elects its 16th national president
 
(BlackNews.com) – The Links, Incorporated and The Links Foundation, Incorporated have elected Glenda Newell-Harris, M.D., as its 16th national president. 
 
The election of Newell-Harris marks the first time a medical doctor will serve at the helm of the organization, and the first time a national president has been elected from the state of California.
 
A 29-year member of the Alameda Contra-Costa (CA) Chapter of The Links, Incorporated, (Oakland Bay Area), Newell-Harris steps into her new role after having served four years as the organization’s national vice president.

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  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom
  • Category: National

African-American unemployment best in 6 years

African-American unemployment best in 6 years
WASHINGTON – The African-American unemployment rate hit a six-year low in June, dipping below 11 percent for the first time since August 2008.
 
Last week, the Labor Department reported that the African-American jobless rate was 10.7 percent in June, compared to the white unemployment rate, which was 5.3 percent. The unemployment rate for African-American men over 20 years old fell from 11.5 percent in May to 10.9 percent in June, compared to white men who saw their jobless rate decrease from 5 percent to 4.9 percent over the same period.
 
The jobless rate for African-American women over 20 years-old continued to improve, dropping one percentage point, from 10 percent in May to 9 percent in June. The unemployment rate for white women ticked down one-tenth of a percentage point from 4.9 percent in May to 4.8 percent in June.

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  • Written by Freddie Allen-NNPA News Service
  • Category: National

LGBT center’s 26-year-old 1st African-American chair faces facial hostility

LGBT center’s 26-year-old 1st African-American chair faces facial hostility
According to North Carolina’s Charlotte Post, the LGBT Community Center of Charlotte has elected Ranzeno Frazier as its youngest and first African-American chair of its board of trustees. But not everyone is happy about his groundbreaking role.
 
Frazier’s selection was met with both positive and negative responses, with naysayers taking issue with his age and experience, the paper reports. Most disturbing: Some explicitly attacked the 26-year-old with race-based insults, according to the paper.
 
Frazier says he received derogatory emails and text messages, including one in which he was called a “dumb n--ger” who didn’t deserve the position.

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  • Written by Erin C.J. Robertson-The Root
  • Category: National

All students benefit from minority teachers

All students benefit from minority teachers
Despite the cry from people of color for more teachers who look like them, both whites and blacks benefit from a more diverse teaching force, according to a study by Center of American Progress.
 
“… A study of the relationship between the presence of African-American teachers in schools and African-American students’ access to equal education in schools found that fewer African Americans were placed in special-education classes, suspended, or expelled when they had more teachers of color, and that more African-American students were placed in gifted and talented programs and graduated from high school,” stated the report.

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  • Written by Freddie Allen-NNPA News Service
  • Category: National

How Marfan syndrome took center stage on NBA draft night, and in an infant’s life

How Marfan syndrome took center stage on NBA draft night, and in an infant’s life
It was like a bad dream. Four days before Baylor University basketball star Isaiah Austin would hear his name called in the NBA draft in June, a routine physical revealed that he had a genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. His NBA career was over, but as he noted, his life was not.
Victoria Everett knows Austin’s nightmare firsthand.
 
When the 27-year-old Philadelphian heard her baby boy diagnosed with Marfan syndrome earlier this year, she was not sure what to think. Neither she nor her family had any idea what the condition was.
 
When Josiah was only 33 weeks in the womb, he had already been diagnosed with an enlarged heart, but it wasn’t until after he was born on Jan. 10 that the true extent of his condition came into the grim light.

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  • Written by Breanna Edwards-The Root
  • Category: National

Use of arrest records at heart of class action suit against U.S. Census Bureau

Use of arrest records at heart of class action suit against U.S. Census Bureau
Did the U.S. Census Bureau unlawfully screen out approximately 250,000 African-Americans from temporary jobs for the 2010 census?
 
That’s the assertion in a class action lawsuit certified by a New York federal court on Monday (July 1st), the eve of the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Civil Right Act of 1964.
 
U.S. Magistrate Judge Frank Maas’ 61-page opinion ensures that the lawsuit, pursued under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, will go forward as a class action on behalf of African-American job applicants who were denied Census Bureau employment because of its criminal background check policy.
Filed in April 2010, the lawsuit alleges that in hiring nearly a million temporary workers, most of whom went door to door seeking information from residents, the Census Bureau erected unreasonable, largely insurmountable, hurdles for applicants with arrest records – regardless of whether the arrests were decades old, for minor charges, or led to criminal convictions.

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  • Written by Outten & Golden LLP
  • Category: National