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‘Jerusalem 3D’ – giant-screen experience – ready for Memphis run

jerusalem 600Jerusalem: sacred to half the people on earth; fought over more than any other place in history; conquered and destroyed, rebuilt and reinvented repeatedly over 5,000 years. And beginning Saturday (April 19th), visitors to the Crew Training International Giant Theater at the Memphis Pink Palace Museum will get a 3D feel for the ancient city.

"Jerusalem 3D" will be the vehicle for the giant-screen film experience. Locally presented by the Methodist Healthcare Center of Excellence in Faith & Health, the film is an original production from Cosmic Picture and Arcane Pictures and distributed by National Geographic Entertainment.

Narrated by Benedict Cumberbatch ("Star Trek into the Darkness," PBS's "Sherlock"), "Jerusalem 3D" is billed as a grand-scale exploration of "the intersection of science, history and religion in this ancient, enigmatic place."

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Are voters really influenced by political signs?

politicalsign 600If you are a living and breathing human being in the U.S.A, then chances are you have noticed the very recent onslaught of political signs that are cropping up in your neighborhoods, near your schools and outside voting precincts, on vacant property and along busy streets and intersections everywhere within your cities. While the presence (or lack of) a single yard sign or cluster of signs within a neighborhood may indicate the level of support for a particular candidate, or how much money the candidate has, it's hard to tell otherwise what those random signs are telling us.

Most signs typically don't tell you anything about the candidate, other than the name of the candidate and the office they are seeking. One wonders if random political signs even have the ability to influence a voter.

This leads us to a recent study we reported on in last month's FYI on the "low information" voter. The "low information" voter has frequently been talked about in the media. They are known as a segment of the voting population that typically has little interest or understanding of political issues and maintains minimal to no exposure to news media that expose the candidates and the issues surrounding them.

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Whitewashing Republican support of civil rights

raynard jacksonOne of the best-kept secrets over the past 50 years is that, proportionately, Republicans in Congress supported passage of the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act by a much wider margin than Democrats.

As CNN.com reported, "The Guardian's Harry J. Enten broke down the vote, showing that more than 80 percent of Republicans in both houses voted in favor of the bill, compared with more than 60 percent of Democrats. When you account for geography, according to Enten's article, 90 percent of lawmakers from states that were in the union during the Civil War supported the bill compared with less than 10 percent of lawmakers from states that were in the Confederacy."

This is from a report from CNN, not FOX, the network despised by liberals.

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Memories of LBJ, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton

presidents 600Covering the three-day celebration of the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act at the University of Texas last week brought back a string of memories – some fond, some bitter. As a son of the South –Tuscaloosa, Ala., to be specific – I saw first-hand how the region was transformed from America's version of apartheid to one that is perhaps more genuinely accepting of African Americans than any other geographical section of the country.

Lyndon B. Johnson, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton – all white Southerners who grew up in the Jim Crow South – played a significant role in the region's transformation. But that didn't happen in a vacuum. Each was pushed and challenged by the modern civil rights movement, a multi-racial movement, with blacks serving as chief architects that prodded the U.S. to have its deeds mirror its professed ideals. (George W. Bush, a wealthy Texan, is omitted from this discussion because he did nothing significant to advance civil rights. In fact, his appointment of John Roberts and Samuel Alito to the Supreme Court represented a setback to the cause of civil rights.)

While Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); Whitney Young of the National Urban League; NAACP Executive Director Roy Wilkins; John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and Roy Innis of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) receive the lion's share of publicity about the movement, the true heroes were the everyday men and women of the South who risked their jobs and lives to be treated as equals.

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When cops hide behind badge to kill blacks

badgemurder 600WASHINGTON – In 1965, Tuskegee Institute in Alabama was a hotbed for social protest and bred students passionate about equality, justice and civil rights. Seventeen year-old, Ruby Sales, born in Jemison, Ala., was one of those students.

"Once you got the religion of civil rights and you were really in the movement, it was hard to turn around, because there was something about it that wouldn't let you loose," said Sales.

She joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and when youngsters from Lowndes County, Ala., called on the group to help organize demonstration for back payment for sharecroppers and a voting drive, Sales, a sophomore, knew that she had to go.

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