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‘A Dream Foreclosed: Black America and the Fight for a Place to Call Home’

‘A Dream Foreclosed: Black America and the Fight for a Place to Call Home’

Part and parcel of the "American Dream" is a deep desire to purchase that picture-perfect house in suburbia surrounded by the proverbial white picket fence. For generations, African Americans were frustrated in their pursuit of home ownership by de facto and de jure discrimination as reflected in everything from segregation to exclusionary zoning to racial covenants in deeds to the "white only" mortgage provisions of the G.I. Bill to the unwritten laws in Sundown Towns where African Americans weren't allowed to reside after sunset.

Consequently, most minorities ended up cooped in overcrowded, dilapidated tenements and projects in the nation's inner-cities. Then, during the Clinton Administration, Congress passed the Community Reinvestment Act, which mandated that banks finally extend mortgages to blacks and whites alike.

Sadly, racism reared its ugly head anyway in the form of the subprime mortgages issued predominantly to people of color, regardless of their income. And when the housing bubble burst in 2008, African-Americans started taking it on the chin again.

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  • Written by Kam Williams/Special to The New Tri-State Defender

Is it ever OK for a man to hit a woman back?

Is it ever OK for a man to hit a woman back?

Over the past several days, the topic of Jay Z and Solange Knowles fighting in an elevator has ruled the Internet. Most people have wondered what provoked Knowles to attack Jay Z. Other people commended Jay Z for doing what was right and not retaliating against her with a few kicks and punches of his own.

But one media personality believes that any man, including Jay Z, should be able to hit a woman back during a fight.

Whoopi Goldberg, co-host of "The View," doesn't have any double standards when it comes to violence. During Tuesday's episode of the ABC talk show, Goldberg said Jay Z had every right to defend himself and hit Solange back.

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  • Written by Yesha Callahan/The Root

Kam’s Kapsules: OPENING THIS WEEK

Kam’s Kapsules: OPENING THIS WEEK

For movies opening May 16, 2014

BIG BUDGET FILMS

"Godzilla" (PG-13 for intense violence and scenes off destruction) Epic eco-adventure finds the legendary monster reborn and rising to restore balance in the titanic force of nature while humanity stands defenseless. Ensemble includes Bryan Cranston, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Sally Hawkins, David Strathairn, Elizabeth Olsen, Juliette Binoche and Ken Watanabe.

"Million Dollar Arm" (PG for mild epithets and suggestive content) Fact-based drama recounting how sports agent J.B. Bernstein (Jon Hamm) traveled all the way to India to recruit some of the Subcontinent's top cricket pitchers to play major league baseball back in the U.S. Featuring Bill Paxton, Alan Arkin, Aasif Mandvi, Lake Bell and Suraj Sharma. (In English and Hindi with subtitles)

 

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This Rose is a rose is a rose

This Rose is a rose is a rose

Tony Award winner Anika Noni Rose stars alongside Denzel Washington in the Broadway revival of "A Raisin in the Sun." Her outstanding performance has not only earned her critical acclaim but also a Tony award nomination.

She recently starred as Whoopi Goldberg's daughter in the made-for-TV movie, "A Day Late and a Dollar Short." On the big screen, Anika starred as Lorell Robinson in "Dreamgirls," which went on to receive an AFI ensemble award, as well as SAG award nomination for outstanding cast.

Anika won the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her role in "Caroline, or Change." She also tarred in Deborah Allen's Broadway revival of "Cat on A Hot Tin Roof," opposite James Earl Jones and Phylicia Rashad.

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‘The Book of Jeremiah: The Life and Ministry of Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.’

‘The Book of Jeremiah: The Life and Ministry of Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.’

Susan Williams Smith, an author, ordained minister and former mentee of Jeremiah A. Wright Jr., presents an honorable and comprehensive picture of Wright as a man, an African-American, a patriot, scholar, and pastor in her new book – "The Book of Jeremiah: The Life and Ministry of Jeremiah A. Wright Jr."

Smith first met Wright when she was a student at Yale Divinity School. She had heard him preach a stirring sermon, but it was at a dinner with him and the president of Yale that evening that she "became fascinated with this man and his work, and knew his ministry was something of which I wanted to be a part." She asked Wright then and there if she could become an intern at his church, Chicago's Trinity United Church of Christ.

With some help from the United Church of Christ denomination, Smith was able to serve at Trinity, first as an intern, then as associate pastor upon her graduation from Yale. After Trinity, Smith went on to pastor a church in Ohio for 22 years. When Wright and Trinity were maligned during the debacle of the 2008 election, Smith recalled, "I felt in my spirit a need to at least try to tell the story and to embrace those who had embraced me, by writing this book."

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  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom

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