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Entertainment

Kam’s Kapsules: OPENING THIS WEEK

For movies opening June 6, 2014

KamsKaps 600BIG BUDGET FILMS   

 “Edge of Tomorrow” (PG-13 for profanity, intense violence and brief sensuality) Infinite loop sci-fi starring Tom Cruise as the recently-deceased soldier called upon to travel back in time repeatedly to defend the planet against a bloodthirsty race of aliens bent on world domination. With Emily Blunt, Bill Paxton and Brendan Gleeson.

 “The Fault in Our Stars” (PG-13 for sexuality, brief profanity and mature themes)    

Screen adaptation of John Green’s #1 best-seller about the bittersweet romance which blossoms between a terminally-ill teenager (Shailene Woodley) and a patient in remission (Ansel Elgort) she meets at a cancer support group. With Willem Dafoe, Laura Dern, Nat Wolff and Mike Birbiglia.

Amma’s good karma

Amma Asante_600Writer/director Amma Asante talks about her new film, "Belle," a fact-based, historical drama starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw about the daughter of an African slave and a British ship captain who was raised in England as an aristocrat.

Kam Williams: Hi Amma. I'm honored to have this opportunity.
Amma Asante: Thank you very much, Kam. It's my pleasure.

KW: I told my readers I'd be speaking with you, so I'll be mixing in their questions with some of my own.
AA: OK, cool.

 

Leslie Jones’ slave monologue on ‘SNL’ sparks backlash

Leslie Jones_600A portion of Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update featuring Leslie Jones has generated backlash on social media.

During the episode, the writer performed a monologue as an image expert, commenting on People naming Academy Award winning actress Lupita Nyong'o their most beautiful person.

She congratulated the actress, but what followed had Twitter abuzz.

  • Written by Carrie Healey/theGrio

You Gotta see Taraji!

henson 600Taraji P. Henson talks about her new film, "From The Rough," an inspirational biopic where she portrays Catana Starks, the African-American trailblazer who became the first female to coach an NCAA Division-1 men's team when she accepted the reins of the golf squad at Tennessee State University.

Kam Williams: Hi Taraji, thanks for the interview.
Taraji P. Henson: Oh, no worries, Kam.

KW: What interested you in this film?
TPH: Well, first of all, I'd never seen a movie about a female coach before, outside of that Goldie Hawn comedy from years ago, "Wildcats." And I had certainly never seen an African-American woman portrayed this way in a drama. That was the first thing that interested me. Then, when I read the script, I went, "Wow! What an amazing story!" She had all the odds stacked against her, yet she and her team won. And it was all because of the tenacity and belief and passion that she instilled in her players.

‘Stokely: A Life’

Stokely 600"It was Thursday, June 16, 1966... Less than a year before, President Lyndon Johnson had signed the Voting Rights Act... Stokely Carmichael was now in Mississippi to ensure that the federal laws... would apply to black sharecroppers living in plantation communities...

"(Just) released from his latest stay in jail... Stokely's voice broke through the humid Mississippi night... 'This is the 27th time that I've been arrested,' he shouted, 'and I ain't going to jail no more... We want black power!'

"Carmichael made a case for political revolution. 'We have begged the president. We've begged the federal government... Every courthouse in Mississippi ought to be burned down tomorrow!'

The duo at LiveTone Studios

livestudio 600It was close to midnight when I finally made it to LiveTone studios located in what Urban Memphis calls "Blackhaven." The term of endearment echoes the rich pride of the people who live in this part of town and would love nothing less than you knowing that they do.

I came in with a puzzled look on my face after passing by a couple of Memphis famous strip clubs in full swing. Kevin "Sleepy" Plunkett and Tazz Fields were inside taking a break from stirring up music magic and were awaiting my arrival. I kicked back on a couch, ink pen and paper in hand ready to do an interview. I quickly intertwined in a discussion about the state of the music world.

"I like a lot of things about music right now," said Sleepy. "I like the different techniques used now. You can really tell that the people making the beats are giving them a lot of thought. I really do like a lot of the songs that come out. I don't like them all, but I do like some.

  • Written by Kelvin Cowans/Special to the New Tri-State Defender